The role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.

The role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say. Most of the writing today which is called fiction contains such a poverty of language, such triteness, that it is a shrunken, diminished world we enter, poorer and more formless than the poorest cripple deprived of ears and eyes and tongue. The writer’s responsibility is to increase, develop our senses, expand our vision, heighten our awareness and enrich our articulateness.”

- Anaïs Nin, from The Diary of Anaïs Nin, Vol. 5

About Meg Waite Clayton

Meg Waite Clayton is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of four novels, including THE WEDNESDAY SISTERS (a writing group novel) and THE WEDNESDAY DAUGHTERS www.megwaiteclayton.com
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One Response to The role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say.

  1. “Salome’s Conversion” allows the reader to voice doubts about miracles that Mark Twain is quoted as saying, ‘Christianity would do better without.’ The gift of faith transcends the stumbling blocks our finite minds refuse to accept. The Lord is in Heaven and in our hearts listening to our secret needs, balancing the world, and guaranteeing the next dawn.

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